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Gaming Guru

 

Online Casino Job Posting Resources

5 February 2003

In recent years new legislation has opened the door for thousands of new jobs within the casino gaming industry, including everything from dealers and cashiers to waiters and security personnel. In addition the casino industry provides a large number of employment opportunities for individuals with many years of business, regulatory or community experience. Casinos provide great employment opportunities in a growing high tech modern industry. There are a number of resources available to help obtain a job within the casino industry. The Internet provides quick and easy access to a wide variety of jobs anytime day or night.

There are several employment services available for those seeking casino jobs. Casino Careers Online (located at http://www.casinocareers.com) is a web-based service devoted to helping prospective casino employees and employers find one another. It offers a 7-day, 24-hour searchable database of resumes for those seeking casino jobs. It also offers space for casinos to post ads listing positions they need to fill, or to create custom web pages with their personnel needs. For prospective employees, the page offers career tips and periodic update services. Casino Careers Online offers Gaming/Hospitality Corporations a cost-effective resource to publicize their career opportunities and identify qualified Candidates to fill any position within their organization - whether it's in gaming, hospitality, culinary, information technology, human resources, or any other department within the casino industry.

Casino Detroit Magazine (located at http://www.casinodetroit.net) offers employment information for the Detroit area casinos. The website also offers informative articles on every aspect of casinos gambling as well as information on local entertainment and Native American Casino coverage.

The rules and regulations for being an employee in the casino gaming industry are very strict. When Michigan voters passed Proposal E in November of 1996, they initiated the Michigan Gaming Control and Revenue Act (the "Act"), which laid the groundwork for the State to license and regulate the Detroit casinos. Public officials in the City of Detroit, as well as state legislators, in an effort to ensure the highest standards of integrity in Michigans casinos, created a strict and intense system for casino oversight. The Act created a five-member Gaming Control Board, which is responsible for making sure that every person involved in Michigan's casino industry, from those making financial decisions for the three operators to those installing the floorboards in the buildings themselves, meets these standards.

After you have spoken with a casino, you will probably also need to be licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board. Please note that you WILL NOT be allowed to file an Occupational License Application without a statement of intent to hire you from one of the casinos. There are three levels of Occupational (Employee) Licenses. Level One licenses are required for those who will have managerial/supervisory roles in the operation of the casino or casino games. Level Two licenses are for those who work in the gaming area, but do not have supervisory authority. Level Three licenses will be required for those who work in the areas where gaming is conducted, but do not take part in the operations of gaming, and do not handle chips, tokens, or other money equivalents. Applications for employees can be found on the Michigan Gaming Control Board's web site. However, you must first contact the casino operator of your choice and secure a letter from them stating their intent to hire you.

Michigan is currently home to 17 Native American Casinos that are operated by nine federally recognized Indian tribes. These casinos are located in all areas of Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas. This shows the incredible variance in casino properties which provides for a variety of employment options. The State of Michigan does not have a regulatory role in Michigan's tribal casinos. The staff of the Michigan Gaming Control Board has a narrow oversight role, which does not include the licensing of tribal casino employees. The Native American tribes each have their own rules and regulations, as well as their own hiring process and requirements for casino employees. If you are interested in working in one of the tribal casinos, you should contact the tribal casino directly.

The casino gaming industry is likely to continue to grow as public acceptance to this form of entertainment expands. Therefore, persons interested in making a career change or young people looking for an industry with advancement potential should consider investigating the opportunities available in the casino gaming industry.

David Waddell
David Waddell is an attorney for Regulatory Management Counselors, P.C. (RMC), which assists businesses in navigating the legislative, regulatory and licensing systems governing Michigan’s commercial and tribal casino industries. He is the co-author of The State of Michigan Gaming Law Legal Resource Book and one of the founders of The Michigan Gaming Newsletter.

David Waddell Websites:

www.michigangaming.com
David Waddell
David Waddell is an attorney for Regulatory Management Counselors, P.C. (RMC), which assists businesses in navigating the legislative, regulatory and licensing systems governing Michigan’s commercial and tribal casino industries. He is the co-author of The State of Michigan Gaming Law Legal Resource Book and one of the founders of The Michigan Gaming Newsletter.

David Waddell Websites:

www.michigangaming.com